Allow the animal to say “I can’t do this” or “I don’t understand”. Let the animal lead the dance.  Alexandra Kurland

This quote is particularly applicable in Canine Parkour for our senior dogs.  

Senior Titles are the Standard Parkour Titles, but done from the viewpoint that are seniors have physical and sometimes cognitive issues that prevent them from functioning as a younger dog.

Here is Brynda telling me that she no longer feels safe on ramps or the balance beam.  3 years ago her favorite activity was playground equipment in particular any slide she could find.

With an old dog you grieve a little bit every day. You grieve the loss of the activities you used to share, the energy and endurance, the able-bodied way he used to move, the interactions he used to have with the world. You even grieve the naughty things; barking and lunging at dogs across the street, “whoo-whoo-whoo”-ing at the knock at the door, the scattered, half-asleep race to the door at the sound of the doorbell on TV, getting into the garbage while you’re at work, sneaking into your bed and shedding all over your clean pillows, even counter-surfing. You grieve the loss of his hearing and sight, you grieve the deep sleeps that are now interrupted by restlessness and sometimes wandering confusion. You grieve the future because now it’s like muddy water – you can’t tell what’s in it but it doesn’t feel great.

But there are great things still with our older or disabled dogs.  They have courage and tenacity that a younger dog can't conceive of.  They know their bodies and how to move them despite the infirmities they might have.  That poetry in motion is more evident in an older or disabled dog then the quick, sometimes jerky, but never still movements of the young.

The muzzle is greying giving even more character to a face you love. The tail wags less but you know when it does that your dog is really impressed.  More sleep, less play, but that play is full of fun and laughter.  This is where 5 minute training games really shine.  Older dogs and the disabled learn like lightning and retain it with minimal repitition.  

Get out there with your dog, young, old, tripod or bad back and have some fun.

In Training




Standard Parkour

Tucker

Brinkley


Jumpers Parkour


Creative Parkour